Twin Six Standard Rando v2; Quick Review

Twin Six Standard Rando v2; Quick Review – by Guitar Ted with additional comments from Andy

The Twin Six Standard Rando v2 in an outdoor setting
Guitar Ted’s Standard Rando v2 set up single speed with 650B X 47mm WTB Venture tires.

Recently Twin Six, the apparel company from Minneapolis, Minnesota, introduced their new update to the Standard Rando, a bike we have reviewed in the past. The company, known mostly for their fashionable threads, might not be on your radar for a bicycle, but after reading this review, you may change that viewpoint. (Yes- we like the new version)

Now that we’ve given away the ending, read on to see what Twin Six have done with the newest version, which we’ve dubbed “v2”, of the Standard Rando.

A Standard Rando v2 in an outdoor setting
Andy set his black Standard Rando v2 up 1X with 650B wheels and tires.

Much has remained the same with the Standard Rando. It still is a butted steel frame with a mono-stay rear and a uni-crown steel fork. It still cuts a classic profile with a nearly level top tube. It still supports the 700c and 650B wheel sizes. Even the paint scheme, although rendered in different colors, is the same as the original one had. (Note: A new scheme is to be unveiled Friday, September 4th, 2020) What is different is seen in the details, and in the nuances of the ride performance.

Of course, there is now a carbon fiber option for the fork. This combined with a 44mm head tube makes the new Standard Rando v2 look a bit different than the first version. There still is a steel fork available as well, so don’t fret if that appeals to you more than a carbon fork. Both steel and carbon forks also come with two sets of triple accessory bosses, one set on each fork leg. There are also two water bottle boss sets on the inside of the main triangle on the down tube- only on larger sizes- along with the seat tube mounted set. A set of bosses can also be used underneath the down tube. The brakes mount now via the new standard set by the use of flat mount brakes. Tire clearances were tweaked so that now a 700 X 43 fits with room under the rear mono-stay instead of barely clearing, as it was with the original Standard Rando.

The Standard Rando v2 with 700c wheels in an outdoor setting
Guitar Ted’s Standard Rando v2 with 700c X 42mm tires.

Some things remain the same. Rack and fender mounts are to be found front and rear. Configurable clips for full-run housing are available which allows for 2X, 1X, or single speed set ups. The PF-30 bottom bracket can be set up with an eccentric for single speed, or for an internally geared hub. Painted to match fenders are an option as well.

Twin Six sells the Standard Rando v2 as a frame/fork or in several semi-built and fully built options. Base price for a steel frame and fork is $700.00 USD. A complete build with SRAM Rival Force 1 goes for just south of two-thousand dollars.

Detail of the Standard Rando v2 frame
The move to a 44mm head tube allows for modernized fork choices.

Ride Performance: The steel forked Standard Rando and the carbon forked version were purchased for myself and Andy of Andy’s Bike Shop. Andy opted for the black with steel fork and I got the carbon fork with the “Saffron” color scheme. Geometry hasn’t changed since version one, so the handling is very similar with the deep, 75mm bottom bracket drop and 72° head angle. The choice in wheel size and fork material are really the main, separating factors here.

The carbon fork is a bit stiffer than the steel one, but it does weigh less, which is fairly obvious. It doesn’t seem to make a ton of difference in ride feel, but if we’re splitting hairs, the steel fork seems to provide a slightly more compliant ride overall. In terms of compliance, we feel that the main frame, with its more traditional double triangle layout, seems to soak up the chatter quite nicely, regardless of fork choice. So, despite the forks being pretty stiff, the ride doesn’t seem to suffer much.

Obviously, tires can make a big difference here and the poofier 650B tires which can be fitted will make the ride smoother at a lower pressure than a 700c can be run at. But overall, either wheel size is good on this bike. I prefer the 700c set up over the 650B myself, having tried both on my bike. Andy is sticking with 650B for the time being. He also went geared, while I went single speed. This brings up the PF-30 eccentric to allow for the single speed chain tensioning.

I used the Wheels Manufacturing eccentric bottom bracket in my build and it has been nothing short of perfect after a month and a half of use so far. It gets my nod of approval for setting up this frame as a single speed.

Detail of crank set on a Standard Rando v2
The crank set can be single speed, 1X or a double on the Standard Rando v2

At The Finish: The first Standard Rando set the stage for Twin Six as a brand that makes classically inspired bicycles reflecting the unique stamp of their style in terms of graphics and functionality. The new Standard Rando ups the level set before by the T-6 guys to a new height. We liked the old one, and this newer version obviously does all the good things that older frame did with some more features and better tire clearance. The option of a carbon fork is a welcomed one, but the steel fork is also still there for those who would rather “Ride Metal“. Plus, the value here is really quite good for the dollars spent.

Note: Andy and Guitar Ted paid for the Standard Rando v2 frames and forks and were not paid, nor bribed, for this review. We strive to always give our honest thoughts and opinions throughout.

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Guitar Ted

Author: Guitar Ted

Guitar Ted hails from Iowa. Home of over 70,000 miles of gravel and back roads. Co-creator of Trans Iowa in late 2004, he has been at the forefront of the growth of gravel events and riding since then. Creator of Gravel Grinder News in 2008, he produced the premier calendar of gravel and backroad events. GT joined forces with Riding Gravel in late 2014.

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4 thoughts on “Twin Six Standard Rando v2; Quick Review

  1. Thanks for writing up a review of the Rando. Difficult to learn much about the bike unless you buy one!

    What did the weight of the bike come in at?

      1. Dang. That’s pretty competitive from my survey of the field for steel frame carbon fork gravel specific bikes. Thanks for the reply and sharing your thoughts about the Rando!

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